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Pair of calligraphy scrolls
Place of Origin: Korea
Date: approx. 1830-1850
Historical Period: Joseon dynasty (1392-1910)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Ink on paper
Dimensions: H. 81 in x W. 17 in, H. 205.7 cm x W. 43.2 cm (overall); H. 56 1/2 in x W. 10 1/2 in, H. 143.5 cm x W. 26.7 cm (image)
Credit Line: Gift of Arthur J. McTaggart
Department: Korean Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 1997.25.1-.2
On Display: No

Description

Label:

This calligraphy, bold and decisive, yet carefully controlled, suggests the artist's self confidence. In East Asian tradition of painting and calligraphy, a persons' brushstroke was thought to reveal their personality and inner nature. The seven-character poem in these two hanging scrolls can be translated as follows:

As I write, concocting stories without rules,
This aging heart is ever filled with poems.

Gim Jeong-hui was born into an illustrious family, related by marriage to the imperial household. From an early age, he showed his talent for calligraphy and keen interests in studies. When he accompanied his father on a mission to Beijing, China, Gim met such prominent Chinese scholars as Weng Fanggang and Ruan Yuan and received their praise for his enthusiasm for and knowledge of Chinese Classics. Gim had an extremely successful civil service career. However, his tendency to speak out honestly resulted in his being exiled in 1840 and again in 1848.

Gim created his own style of calligraphy which was characterized by vigorous strokes with a strong contrast between thick and thin lines. This style was highly influential in Korea and well respected by contemporary Chinese and Japanese scholars.


Label:

This calligraphy, bold and decisive, yet carefully controlled, suggests the artist's self confidence. In East Asian tradition of painting and calligraphy, a persons' brushstroke was thought to reveal their personality and inner nature. The seven-character poem in these two hanging scrolls can be translated as follows:

As I write, concocting stories without rules,
This aging heart is ever filled with poems.

Gim Jeong-hui was born into an illustrious family, related by marriage to the imperial household. From an early age, he showed his talent for calligraphy and keen interests in studies. When he accompanied his father on a mission to Beijing, China, Gim met such prominent Chinese scholars as Weng Fanggang and Ruan Yuan and received their praise for his enthusiasm for and knowledge of Chinese Classics. Gim had an extremely successful civil service career. However, his tendency to speak out honestly resulted in his being exiled in 1840 and again in 1848.

Gim created his own style of calligraphy which was characterized by vigorous strokes with a strong contrast between thick and thin lines. This style was highly influential in Korea and well respected by contemporary Chinese and Japanese scholars.