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Trousers
Place of Origin: Philippines, Mindanao
Date: 1850-1925
Materials: Bast fiber and cotton
Dimensions: H. 21 1/4 in x W. 26 1/4 in, H. 54.0 cm x W. 66.7 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Dr. Stephen A. Sherwin and Merrill Randol Sherwin
Department: Southeast Asian Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: 2010.357
On Display: Yes
Location: Tateuchi Thematic Gallery

Description

Label:

Filipino weavers are renowned for their skill in creating textiles from leaf fibers like piña (leaves from a type of pineapple plant) and abaca (fibers from leaves of a species of banana tree). This pair of men’s pants (salwal) is made of abaca. The term for pants is similar in many Philippine languages and is ultimately derived from a Persian term for trousers, shalwar. It was likely that Muslim traders, who had come to the Philippines by the 1300s, introduced pants to a culture that commonly wore loincloths or draped, saronglike garments.

The pattern on the cloth is created by a stitchresist technique known as tritik, similar to the Japanese technique of shibori. First a pattern is marked on the cloth, and then a thread is stitched following the pattern. One end of the sewing thread is pulled tight, gathering and compressing the fabric and protecting certain areas when the textile is dipped into a dye bath. When the stitches are removed, the protected areas retain the original color of the undyed cloth.


More Information

Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018
Label:

Filipino weavers are renowned for their skill in creating textiles from leaf fibers like piña (leaves from a type of pineapple plant) and abaca (fibers from leaves of a species of banana tree). This pair of men’s pants (salwal) is made of abaca. The term for pants is similar in many Philippine languages and is ultimately derived from a Persian term for trousers, shalwar. It was likely that Muslim traders, who had come to the Philippines by the 1300s, introduced pants to a culture that commonly wore loincloths or draped, saronglike garments.

The pattern on the cloth is created by a stitchresist technique known as tritik, similar to the Japanese technique of shibori. First a pattern is marked on the cloth, and then a thread is stitched following the pattern. One end of the sewing thread is pulled tight, gathering and compressing the fabric and protecting certain areas when the textile is dipped into a dye bath. When the stitches are removed, the protected areas retain the original color of the undyed cloth.


Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018